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Fujixpassion.com Reviews the M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap

Simplr M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap Review at fujixpassion.com

We’ve made it no secret that, although our straps work well on virtually all mirrorless cameras, we’ve got a particular affinity for Fujifilm cameras. So, we were pretty excited to be reviewed by fujixpassion.com.

Here’s a snippet:

“As soon as I took out the M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap from the packaging, the first thing that stands out is the build quality. Although it’s a very simple piece (as the name implies), everything on this strap denotes a high standard of quality, from the materials chosen to the manufacturing itself. The nylon strap is thin, light and soft.”

Read the full review at fujixpassion.com.

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Patrick La Roque Reviews his Simplr Camera Straps

Patrick La Roque's Camera Straps

Patrick La Roque is a photographer, writer, speaker, and member of the Kage Collective.

He’s a remarkable visual storyteller, who’s work could equally evoke calm or frenzy, warmth or solitude.

Here’s a little of what Patrick thinks about his M1a & M1w:

“…Basically, these are products that don’t flash or glitter, that don’t call attention to themselves at all. Everything about them is understated and subtle. But they’re beautifully crafted and ready-made for mirrorless systems. …As much as I still love the feel of my leather straps, I can’t dismiss how much lighter and easier to work with these are. Just quickly being able to vary the length with little friction, to remove them altogether if they’re in the way…it all adds up.”

Read the full review on Patrick’s site.

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Palle Schultz Reviews the Fuji X-H1 & our M1a has a Cameo

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Coinciding with the release of Fujifilm’s new X-H1, Palle Schultz discusses this camera’s capabilities in both technological — and real world terms — as only Palle can.

You may recognize Palle’s strap of choice — our very own M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap (in Castor Gray)!

Palle Schultz is a photographer and videographer based in Denmark, and an official Fujifilm X-photographer.

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Flemming Bo Jensen Reviews his M1a Mirrorless Camera Straps

Flemming Bo Jensen's Bag and Fuji X-T2 with Simplr Mirrorless Camera Strap

Flemming Bo Jensen is a music photographer … More specifically, he’s known for his uncanny ability to capture the concertgoer experience at live music venues. Whether small, huge, beautiful or chaotic — Flemming distills it into gorgeous still images.

Flemming reviews his dueling M1a camera straps:

What I like about the Simplr M1a strap…

This strap is long! Fully extended, it is 142cm. This is really nice, it is the longest camera strap I have used. I am a tall Scandinavian techno viking with long arms (sorry, this is like an intro to an online dating profile). Not only can I comfortably wear my camera across my body with this strap, the strap is long enough I can just pick up the camera and shoot without taking the strap off my body first. The nylon is smooth to slide easily around my body, so nothing gets entangled. No strap I have used could do this, it is an awesome way to work. Only when I have to shoot overhead, arms raised over my head (watch Dual Vision and you shall see it in action) do I still have to un-attach the strap from my body.(This may be the weirdest paragraph I have ever written, it is hard to describe this stuff!)

It is simple, non flashy, flexible and light weight. It is just a strap. Simple as that. Minimal and very light weight. Never gets in the way. Very supple too. Not pretty but heck, it’s a strap.

The quick-release connectors. I don’t shoot a lot of video, but it is still nice when I need to that I can unclick the strap in 2 seconds. The quick-release connectors used to get in my way until I attached the strap directly to the camera strap loops.

Easily adjustable length. From 91cm to 142cm. I now pretty much shoot with the strap going across my body all the time, but sometimes I am shooting action packed gigs where I know I will constantly swap between camera to my eye and camera over my head. Then I just shorten the strap completely and wrap it once around my right hand and the camera is securely attached now to carry all the time, and the strap is not in the way.

Flemming is an official Fujifilm ambassador, an official Red Bull Photographer, 1/2 of worldwide media makers Roaming Frame, member of Gonzales Photo agency and author of the ebook Get In The Loop.

Read the full review at flemmingbojensen.com.

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Fujifilm Presents “Dual Vision” (but just one camera strap)

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Fujifilm Global just released this video featuring the Roaming Frame dynamic duo of Charlene Winfred and Flemming Bo Jensen — plus their dueling X-Pro2 and X-T2 cameras. It’s a fun but informative piece talking about the differences between these two cameras, and the photographers that use them. Watch closely and you’ll see they both prefer the same camera strap — our Simplr M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap.

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Weights of Some Fujifilm Cameras, Lenses & Combos

Weights of Fuji Camera and Lens Combos Calculator

Select your camera by column, and scroll down to the row with your preferred lens. That’s the approximate weight of your rig. If you don’t see your camera here, refer to the next closest model (e.g.: If you have an X-Pro1, refer to the X-Pro2 column).

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Charlene Winfred Reviews Her M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap

Charlene Winfred's Fuji X-Pro2 with a Desert Tan Simplr M1a

Charlene Winfred is a nomad photographer, videographer, writer, Fujifilm X-series ambassador and half the production team of Roaming Frame.

Charlene’s approach to equipment epitomizes what we’re about here at Simplr: No muss. No fuss. Things should just work, work well, and keep working … without too much thought.

She even came up with a couple of new ideas for her M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap — including lashing extra weight to a tripod (and one more that we hope she’ll never need to make use of).

“The Simplr promise is, well, simple. Their straps are strong, functional, and aesthetically understated. All the qualities I like in equipment, in general.

Things I really like about my strap:

  1. It’s long. I can wear my camera slung across my body, which is SUPER. Never had a strap I could do this with.
  2. It weighs nothing. This is always a boon.
  3. Because it’s made of nylon, it’s also extremely supple and very comfortable to use.
  4. It’s super convenient for video because the main strap snaps off, and the connectors are so light, they make no difference hanging there on the little X-E3, whether it’s on a gimbal or tripod.
  5. The main strap, when disconnected, is useful as a general tie down.

As advertised, this thing just works with no fuss. Like the camera, it doesn’t get in the way, and you don’t have to fiddle with it. Attach it, forget about it and go shoot. If you need a tourniquet, it’s there for you.”

Read the full review at CharleneWinfred.com

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Kevin Mullins’ Fujifilm X-E3 Review (plus a few words about his M1a)

M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap on Kevin Mullins' X-E3

Kevin Mullins is a highly regarded UK wedding photographer.

In addition to his impressive professional wedding portfolio, he also runs the popular f16.click site, dedicated to his personal work and all things Fuji.

Kevin recently posted his thoughts on the Fujifilm X-E3 … and we’re happy to report that it pairs nicely with the Simplr M1a he’s got attached to it.

“By the way, the strap you see in these images is a Simplr Camera Strap which I picked up whilst in New York. It’s a really comfortable, non-slip and visually attractive strap.”

He’s an official Fujifilm X-photographer, and member of The KAGE Collective — an international group of visual story tellers.

Read Kevin’s full X-E3 review at f16.click

 

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Palle Schultz’s Video Rig … with a Simplr M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap

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Palle Schultz is a photographer and videographer based in Denmark, and an official Fujifilm X-photographer.

In this video Palle talks about his compact video rig … including a Fujifilm XT-2, and a Simplr M1a camera strap, for stabilization and insurance against accidental drops.

“I really like it because it’s easy to snap off, and the ends are really small … The good thing about having it here, is you can actually stabilize with it … and also as a safety precaution if you drop the camera.”

Check out his YouTube channel.

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Bert Stephani Reviews his M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap

Bert Stephani's Fuji X100F with a Desert Tan Simplr M1a

Bert Stephani posts his thoughts on his M1a Mirrorless Camera Strap, along with some excellent images.

He’s a Belgian commercial and editorial photographer, an official Fujifilm X-photographer, and member of The KAGE Collective — an international group of visual story tellers.

“I have been looking for a new camera strap that is both functional and stylish without breaking the bank. … at 42 USD, it seemed to be too good to be true. … So far, I love this strap. It has pretty much everything I personally want in a strap.”

Read the full review at BertStephani.info

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Strap Lug Inserts: What are they and why should I care?

Fujifilm strap lug insert

What They Are

Strap lug inserts are hardened metal “sleeves” located inside strap lugs. They’re meant to reduce metal-on-metal wear caused when hard steel split rings rub against softer metal lugs. Some cameras have strap lug inserts and some don’t.

Fujifilm cameras are notorious for having potentially jagged strap lug inserts, and all modern Fuji cameras including later production X-Pro1 and X-E1 have them.

This is what they look like, inside the strap lugs:

This is what a Fujifilm strap lug insert looks like in the lug.

Why You Should Care

If your camera has jagged strap lug inserts (like the ones shown above), and you attach the camera strap cord loops straight to the camera (without split rings), they can prematurely wear the cord loops.

Installation Options for Cameras with Strap Lug Inserts

  1. Use split-rings. Attach the cord loops to the split-rings like so: How to Attach Mini QD Loops to Cameras with Split Rings
  2. Try to carefully remove the inserts as discussed here: Removing Strap Lug Inserts from Some Fujifilm Cameras.
  3. Purchase extra Mini QD Loops, and check them for wear often.
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Removing Strap Lug Inserts from Fujifilm Cameras (Optional)

What you'll need to remove the strap lug inserts from your Fuji camera.

If you’ve got a Fujifilm camera, and you’d like to attach your Mini QD Loops™ directly to your camera, you might* be able to remove your strap lug inserts to reveal a smoother point of attachment. Please note that if you scratch a strap lug during this procedure, you could very easily make them sharper than the strap lug inserts you just removed!

*Date of manufacture, environmental and other factors all play a part. Cameras that are exposed to the elements are particularly susceptible to galvanic corrosion which can “glue” metal parts together. Use your best judgement, and know that we’re not responsible if you damage anything.

Although we use Optech USA Mini QD Loops, this procedure is applicable to other cord loop connectors, like Peak Design.

What You’ll Need

  • your camera
  • camera body cap
  • bath towel
  • 2.5mm hex key
  • thread

How to Do It

  1. Remove the lens from your camera.
  2. Put on the body cap.
    Install the Fujifilm body cap.
  3. Lay the camera face down on the bath towel.
    Getting ready to remove the strap lug inserts from your Fuji camera.
  4. Use the 2.5mm hex key to push the strap lug inserts out, from back to font. This might take a medium amount of force, but shouldn’t require the use of any additional tools.
    Pushing out the Fuji strap lug inserts to install string disconnect like Optech or Peak Design
  5. Repeat on the opposite lug. Keep them in a safe place, so you can re-insert them if need be.
    Strap lug inserts popped out of Fuji lug
  6. Examine the strap lugs to make sure you haven’t left any scratches. Run a piece of thread through the hole, pull it tightly and drag it around the lug repeatedly to check for burrs. If you can saw through the thread, it will eventually saw through the cord loops!

Next…

If everything checks out nice and smooth, you can install your connector loops straight to your camera as shown here: How to Attach Mini QD Loops to Cameras without Split Rings